Dr. Teresa Merriweather Orok, chairman

Dr. W. Franklin Evans, vice chairman

Ms. Sharon Brooks Hodge, executive director

Dr. James Rodriguez

Rev. Neely Williams

How to Contact Us


by email:

director@blackfamilies.org


by postal mail:

     P.O. Box 25497

     Garfield Heights, OH 44125

Services for families

  • Marriage Enrichment
  • Parenting
  • Reentry Programs
  • Healthcare
  • Wealth Building
  • Education
  • Housing

Black Family Preservation Group, Inc. advocates for black families by:


  • Identifying the obstacles that tear our families apart;
  • Disseminating news, events, and published research studies about African-American families;
  • Conducting and publishing research on black families and efforts to strengthen them;
  • Promoting positive images of black families;
  • Encouraging the preservation of traditional two-parent family to black youth, teens, young adults, married and unmarried couples.

WHAT WE BELIEVE


Families are the foundation for our future. One of the things Jesus Christ taught pertains to the very foundation of any society - the family, which begins when a man leaves his father and mother to be joined to his wife and the two become one flesh. Jesus asserted God's authority over marriage; it is God's institution.


We believe that the importance of marriage often is undervalued in contemporary society. Many children of unwed couples do flourish, but research shows that on average they are at greater risk of living in poverty and developing social, behavioral, and academic problems than children growing up with their married parents.


We believe it is important to prepare young men and women to be husbands and wives, particularly during this era where marriage, fidelity and lasting unions are out of vogue.

Strengthening the family unit within African-American Culture

Did You Know?

  • Less than 5 percent of black churches offer any type of marriage or family support ministry;
  • During Reconstruction, marriage rates among African Americans surpassed marriage rates in the white community. Black people raised children in two-parent homes well into the 1960s;
  • Today more than 70 percent of black children are born into unstable home environments lacking a married mother and father to provide the nurturing foundation that God established for families;
  • Within black culture, sex, love and raising children have become a la carte choices rather than a package deal that comes with marriage;
  • Data shows that most African Americans still value and desire marriage. One recent study found that 77 percent of black adults ages 19 to 35 say they want to get married;
  • Children raised in stable families have a better chance of being successful, responsible adults capable of raising a healthy family.